Healthy Joints, Happy Joints

Just like motor oil keeps your car running smoothly, there’s an important fluid that lubricates and nourishes your joints. This substance is called synovial (syn ö vi àl) fluid, and joints that contain it — like your shoulders and hips — are called synovial joints.
As you move, sacks of this fluid cushion your knees and elbows against friction, and these sacks are known as bursae (bûr`s∂). When you hear people talk about tennis elbow — outer elbow pain often caused by repetitive motion — they actually have inflamed bursae, which physicians refer to as bursitis.
Joint pain can interfere with your physical activity and daily life. The flip side, however, is that as your fitness level increases, joint pain may decrease. Here are some things you can do to encourage both of these desired results:
  • Warm up before any activity. Try this for your knees: Sit in a chair, and slowly raise your left foot until your leg is straight. Hold for a second, and slowly lower it. Repeat this motion 10 to 15 times with each leg.
  • To warm up your hips and get a great back massage in

Breakfast for Kids Can Be Healthy and Fast

“Children need breakfast everyday for a variety of reasons,” says Roberta Anding, a registered dietitian at the Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston. “Actively growing children need food at regular intervals to fuel their bodies and brains. Skipping breakfast gives as much as a 10- to 12-hour time frame with no food, and the potential for compromised school performance and irritability.”

In addition, “for children who eat breakfast, there is better regulation of body weight,” says Anding. Other benefits:

  • Eating breakfast increases the chances of an overall healthier diet.
  • Kids who start the day with a healthy meal are more likely to play sports and be more physically active.
  • Eating breakfast improves a child’s ability to concentrate and perform in school.

Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Kids

Avoid giving children sweet foods for breakfast, like doughnuts or cereals high in sugar, because after the sugar high wears off, they are likely to get tired. “Healthy options include whole grain, low-sugar cereal with low-fat milk and fresh fruit, or a yogurt berry parfait with granola,” says Anding. Or, you might offer your child a whole-grain English muffin with peanut

10 Kidney Health Resolutions

  1. Eat breakfast. Breakfast didn’t earn its reputation as the most important meal of the day for no reason. Studies show you’re less likely to overeat during the day if you eat a healthy breakfast in the morning.

2. Avoid unnecessary pain killers. Many people don’t realize that the same medications that help alleviate your aches can have dangerous side effects, including harming the kidneys. It’s important to read both prescription and over the counter (OTC) drug labels in order to evaluate the risks and benefits before taking a particular medication.

3. Exercise. Yes, you’ve heard this one before, but there is a reason that getting more exercise is a perennially popular resolution. Physical activity offers many health benefits, including decreasing blood pressure, increasing muscle strength, lowering blood fat levels (cholesterol and triglycerides), improving sleep, increasing insulin sensitivity and helping control body weight. If those weren’t reason enough to lace up your sneakers, studies have also shown that kidney patients who exercise have better outcomes for dialysis and transplantation. Increasing activity by 150 minutes per week is recommended.

The Common Killer You Might Be Ignoring

Blood clots kill one in four people worldwide. That’s right, one in four deaths on this planet are caused by blood clots, also known by the medical term thrombosis. If you’re surprised by these blood clot facts, you’re not alone. A survey that I and others conducted with the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis steering committee of the United States, along with eight other countries from North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia, found that public awareness of thrombosis was low overall (at 68 percent), and for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in particular (at about 50 percent) — much lower than awareness of other health conditions.

Far more people surveyed were aware of high blood pressure, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and AIDS (90 percent, 85 percent, 82 percent, and 87 percent, respectively).

Only 45 percent of people who responded to the survey were aware that blood clots are preventable. Few knew the major risk factors for VTE, like hospitalization, surgery, and cancer (awareness of 25 percent, 36 percent, and 16 percent, respectively).

Thrombosis is the underlying cause of heart

A middle-aged woman with polyarthritis and comorbid obesity

Submitted by Dr B Elliot Cole, Consultant, Pain Education; Former Medical Director, Shoals Hospital Senior Care Centre, Alabama; Former Executive Director, American Society of Pain Educators; and Former Director of Education, American Academy of Pain Management, USA.

In this case study, Dr B Elliot Cole describes the pain management of a middle-aged woman with polyarthritis and comorbid obesity. The patient responds well to treatment with buprenorphine transdermal patch 20 mg.

Donna is an obese 52-year-old woman with advanced osteoarthritis of her hands, knees, ankles and back. She presents with increasing pain for the past 3 years, stating she was told by an orthopedic surgeon that she must wait a few more years, until her pain is no longer controlled with medication, before she may have joint replacement surgery.

She describes pain as often 7 out of 10 (using a 0-to-10 scale, where 0 signifies no pain at all and 10 signifies the worst pain imagined). Pain is exacerbated by performing activities of daily living, including prolonged standing, lifting, walking, carrying objects, writing, doing household chores, bending forward at the waist and dressing. Pain is partially relieved with acetaminophen, ibuprofen, oxycodone, rest, hot showers for

Any Exercise Benefits Kids’ Heart Health

Their study found that children and teens who got more moderate to vigorous physical exercise daily than their peers had better cholesterol levels, blood pressure and weight, which are important for long-term health.

“Parents, schools and institutions should facilitate and promote physical activity of at least moderate intensity in all children and be less concerned about the total amount of time spent sedentary, at least in relation to these cardiovascular risk factors,” said study author Ulf Ekelund, group leader of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Program at the Institute of Metabolic Science in Cambridge, England.

“We demonstrated that higher levels of physical activity of at least moderate intensity — equal to brisk walking — are associated with [improving] many cardiovascular disease risk factors, regardless of the amount of time these children spent sedentary,” he said.

For example, those children who belonged to the most active group had a smaller waist than those in the least active group, he said.

“In adults, this difference is associated with an about 15 percent increased relative risk of premature death,” Ekelund said.

The type of activity is not important

Not Enough Kids Drink Low-Fat Milk

Drinking milk is important for children’s bone health, but CDC experts advise that although young people need the calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients found in milk, children aged 2 and older should consume low-fat milk and milk products to avoid unnecessary fat and calories.

The research, published in a CDC report titled “Low-fat Milk Consumption Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2007-2008,” showed that about 73 percent of children and teens drink milk, but only about 20 percent of them say they usually drink low-fat milk (skim or 1 percent).

Meanwhile, the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey also revealed that about 45 percent drink reduced-fat milk (2 percent) and 32 percent reported they drink whole milk regularly.

Older children and teens drink low-fat milk more often than younger children. Although 13 percent of kids aged 2 to 5 usually drink low-fat milk, 21 percent of kids aged 6 to 11 years said they do, along with 23 percent of teens aged 12 to 19.

Ethnicity and income also seem to play a role in the type of milk children consume.

For joggers, less may be more

Jogging is one of those activities that seem to perfectly embody the concept of healthy physical activity. I know people who run for an hour or more a day. I admire their commitment to physical activity and sometimes envy their seeming good health. But a new study from Denmark has me rethinking the benefits of strenuous jogging.

Researchers with the ongoing Copenhagen City Heart Study have been following the health of more than 1,000 joggers and 400 healthy but inactive non-joggers. Between 2001 and 2014, 156 of these study participants died. Using the death rate of the sedentary non-joggers as a point of comparison, the researchers found that the death rate of light joggers was 90% lower than that of the non-joggers, while that of moderate joggers was about 60% lower. Here’s the big surprise: the death rate for strenuous joggers was no different than that of sedentary non-joggers. This kind of relationship is known as a U-shaped curve (see figure).In this study, jogging for just an hour a week was associated with a significantly lower death rate. The most beneficial combination was jogging at a slow or moderate pace two to three times a week, for

Top 12 Strategies for Optimizing Your Health

#1. Add Sprouts to Your Diet

One of the most nutritious powerhouses to add to your diet are sprouts. They are an authentic “super” food that many overlook or have long stopped using. In addition to their nutritional profile, sprouts are also easy and fun to grow in your own home as they don’t require an outdoor garden.

They can contain up to 39 times the nutrition of organic vegetables grown in your own garden, and allow your body to extract more vitamins, minerals, amino acids and essential fats from the foods you eat. During sprouting, minerals, such as calcium and magnesium, bind to protein, making them more bioavailable.

Furthermore, both the quality of the protein and the fiber content of beans, nuts, seeds and grains improves when sprouted. The content of vitamins and essential fatty acids also increase dramatically during the sprouting process. Sunflower seed, broccoli and pea sprouts tend to top the list of all the seeds that you can sprout and are typically each about 30 times more nutritious than organic vegetables. While you can sprout a variety of different beans, nuts, seeds and grains, sprouts in general have the following beneficial attributes:

  • Support for cell regeneration
  • Powerful sources of antioxidants,